About your Search

20121108
20121116
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
that will never change, prudential. >> wherever our trains go, the economy goes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> additional corporate funding is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the an nenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. two men faced off for what each said would be his final campaign competing for the hearts and the minds of an economically stressed electorate. president obama won the much discussed battleground states. he won the electoral vote. he won the popular vote of -- and he won an america that revealed itself to be more divided than ever. today the president walked into the east room saying elections have consequences. >> what the american people are looking for is corporation. they're looking for consensus. they're looking for common sense. most of all, they want action. i intend to deliver for them in my second term i expect to find willing partners in bot
today, the biggest talk in town was about the economy. president obama and the republican speaker made their views known on the upcoming fiscal cleiff approaches. both men agreed on the urgency to act. the devil is in the details. >> ladies and gentlemen, that the president and the vice- president of the united states. >> del left the supporters fool you, he knows there is no honeymoon the second time around. he is straight into a living and economic crisis in demanding compromise from politicians. dodge the american people understand we will have differences in disagreements in the months to come. they get back. but on tuesday, they said loud and clear that they won't tolerate this function for politicians that view compromise as a dirty word when americans are out of work, families and small business owners are still struggling to pay the bills. >> automatic tax rises and cuts to government spending could take more than $600 billion out of the economy, leading to 2.1 million jobs lost shrinking by half a percent sign. such a prospect has spooked global markets. riding high on re-elec
makes its once-a-decade leadership change just as the chinese economy faces pressure from outside and in. >> susie: and the fiscal cliff isn't the only uncertainty for c.e.o.s. the future of financial regulations with the c.e.o. of florida-based bank united. >> tom: that and more tonight on nbr! $4.5 billion and guilty pleas to charges of manslaughter and lying to congress. that was the admission today from b.p. two and a half years after the "deepwater horizon" disaster in the gulf of mexico. that disaster killed 11 people and led to the worst oil spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of p
. tom will be along later in the program. congress officially gets back to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and g
credit rating on u.s. debt. right now moody's has a negative outlook on the u.s. economy. worries about a fiscal freefall, kept wall street stocks in check: the dow and nasdaq fell a fraction, while the s&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fiscal showdown in washington, but also about corporate earnings. nearly all of the s&p 500 firms have reported numbers, and profit growth is the slowest since the recession in 2009. and the majority of firms are also reporting disappointing revenues. here's erika miller with a look back at the quarter, and a look ahead. >> reporter: earnings season is drawing to a close. and for many firms it's good riddance. nearly all of the s&p 500 have reported quarterly numbers, and according to s&p capital i.q., profits are up a measly 2%. thomson reuters and factset crunch the numbers slightly differently, and believe profits are actually down. the bigger concern is revenue growth. s&p has the most optimistic analysis with a 0.6% gain. the other two firms see negative growth. firms face an almost universal problem: a slow
is in recession for the second time in three years. unemployment is still going out. the economy is weakening, yet further tax increases are in the pipeline. >> there were protests in at least six european countries today. much of the transport was shut down in a country where unemployment is nearly 26%. in portugal there was a general strike. in greece, protesters cried, and enough is enough. the economy has shrunk 23%. >> they have to a pay attention to the social dimension in europe. at the same time, they have to be a bit more social. they have to be a bit more gentle, but i think they should not step away from austerity measures. >> the stories of hardship and tragedy are increasing. a few days ago, a woman in northern spain committed suicide after being ejected by her home. these protesters are camping, and demanding this be stopped. people are sick of this, he said. sooner or later, it is going to explode. at times in recent weeks, it has seemed as though the eurozone crisis was weakening, but the real economy is worsening, and the frustration is available and s visible on spanish streets.
, the year as an economy has seen a second successive quarter of contracting output. between july and september, there was a fall of 0.1% in overall economic activity. more problems for the euro zone political leadership as they try to chart a course for the single currency. the german finance minister speaking at a business conference said the challenges ahead could be addressed. >> investors cannot ignore europe as the largest economic zone in the long run. or leave it out of their economic considerations. the world needs a strong europe. >> weaker economies brought down the performance of the euro zone. italian output fell by 0.2%. spain and saw the decline of 0.3. france and germany, both registered 0.2% increases. those two major economies could struggle to keep up the momentum. greece has been in recession since 2007. the combination of that and the austerity program provoking protests. a german diplomat was jostled as workers amassed outside a meeting of the german and greek officials. the euro zone economic downturn will not do anything to ease tensions. >> after a week of
into a difficult first quarter in terms of the economy next year. so this is almost a situation where you can't hope for or root for any outcome. you have to let it play out and assess what its impact on the economy can be. but the risks right now are to the downside. the sad thing is that as we speak, the economy is actually doing pretty well. >> susie: that's good to hear. as you know, a number of very high-profile c.e.o.s are meeting with the president at the white house today, the c.e.o.s from companies like ibm and xerox and general electric. how much sway do you think these c.e.o.s have over the president? >> if he is smart, he'll listen to them. but that is not the constituenconstituency will eled him. the coalition that elected him supports his hard line on taxes as a percentage of the total package, and he has an obligation -- incidentally, i think an ideological belief that he has to go that way, and that's -- i think that raises the odds of a difficult -- a very difficult period here politically. and while he loyc listens to them and went through the theatrics of having met with th
. >> the leadership of the world's second-largest economy is being replaced according to plan. the incoming president will come under increasing internal and external pressure. as hu jintao hangs over to -- hands over to xi jinping, demand for social change, health care, pensions grow louder. hu jintao has said there will be no western-style democracy but how much will the media fuel the continued protests? ♪ ♪ >> there is theater, spectacle, but no drama. embolization is not encourage, nor indeed expression. -- improvisation is not encouraged. nor indeed, going against. the script at the party congress is simple, the handover of leadership from one generation to the next. the outgoing man, hu jintao, leaving them with a stark warning. >> combating corruption and promoting political integrity is a clear-cut and long term political commitment at the party. if we fail to hand over this issue well, it could prove fatal to the party. >> recent events have shown the order is fragile. the third most powerful man was disgraced after his wife was convicted of murdering a british businessman. what the lea
monitor is watching the fiscal cliff, but thinks the economy and the stock market will continue gaining strength. russell investment's erik ristuben joins us. >> tom: next friday's meeting at the white house over the fiscal cliff comes as credit rating agency standard and poors put the odds of going over the cliff at 15%. beth ann bovino, senior economist at standard and poor's joins us. beth anne, did you hear anything today from either the president or house speaker that gives you more or less hope about a deal before the end of the year? >> well it sounded that both the president and boehner seemed to be a little bit more interested in working together. now, again this is just one day after the election. so let's see if that holds up. it does look like there are a few olive branches out there. we'll see if it continues. >> putting the odds at one in seven, one in eight we could still go over the cliff. cow agree that that will plunge the u.s. economy into recession and an unemployment rate back over 9%. >> i'm about in agreement with them. i think there are a few details i'm looking
,000 a year. and that makes no sense. it would be bad for the economy and it would hit families that are already struggling to make ends meet. fortunately, we shouldn't need long negotiations or drama to solve that part of the problem. while there may be disagreement in congress over whether or not to raise taxes on folks making over $250,000 a year, nobody-- not republicans, not democrats-- want taxes to go up for folks making under $250,000 a year. so let's not wait. even as we're negotiating a broader deficit reduction package, let's extend the middle-class tax cuts right now. let's do that right now. ( applause ) that one step, that one step would give millions of families, 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses, the certainty that they need going into the new year. it would immediately take a huge chunk of the economic uncertainty off the table. and that will lead to new jobs and faster growth. business will know that consumers, they're not going to see a big tax increase. they'll know that most small businesses won't see this increase. and so, a lot of uncertainty th
: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even struck as far away as tel aviv. three israelis were killed. we begin with this report by john ray of "independent television news." ( gunfire ) >> reporter: in gaza, gunfire and a thirst for revenge. thousands throng the streets for the funeral of a hamas leader killed by israel. the first death of this conflict but how many more will follow? the mood here is of great anger and defiance. militarily, ha
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the investigation that felled the head of the c.i.a. has expanded, to include a high- ranking u.s. military figure. that news rippled outward from the pentagon today, and across official washington. the name of u.s. marine general john allen, the top american commander in afghanistan, surfaced overnight in the scandal that began friday with david petraeus resigning at c.i.a. director. unnamed defense officials say the military is now investigating possibly, quote, inappropriate communications between allen and tampa socialite jill kelley. she had reported getting harassing emails from another woman, pa
economy can't afford that right now. certainly no middle-class family can afford that right now. >> reporter: mr. obama signed legislation extending the bush- era tax cuts two years ago, including those affecting the wealthy, but he said today things are different this time. >> well, two years ago, the economy was in a different situation. we were still very much in the early parts of recovering from the worst economic crisis since the great depression. but what i said at the time is what i meant, which is this was a one-time proposition. and you know, what i have told leaders privately as well as publicly is that we cannot afford to extend the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. what we can do is make sure that middle-class taxes don't go up. mandate, i've got one mandate. i've got a mandate to help middle-class families and families that are working hard to try to get into the middle class. that's my mandate. that's what the american people said. they said, "work really hard to help us." that's my mandate. i don't presume that because i won an election, that everybody suddenly agre
things that, you know, we want folks to do in order to thrive in a changing economy, you've got to do that by having relationships, by being embedded in stable communities. and in my opinion the really big issue is that when you look at mass incarceration, when you look at a lot of other social changes, when you look at family breakdown, i think that these are things that are kind of like an undertow that is shaping what we're seeing happening above the surface and i think the problem is that policy has a hard time dealing with some of these things. it can make a big difference on, for example we can throw fewer people in jail and destroy fewer communities and fewer lives that way. >> california just took steps to weaken their three strikes and you're out policy. that's a step in the right direction. >> and you also have folks on both sides of the political aisle who are making progress on that. >> but in terms of washington politics it looks to me as if all the blood, sweat and tears of this campaign, all those billions of dollars ended up with the status quo. the republican leadersh
's second-largest economy. for many, the pace of political changes to slow. our world affairs editor looks at how an old political system is operating in a changing nation. >> this was once a place without a name. just a number. some secret -- so secret it was not on the map. it was an industrial zone where armaments were made. so-called district 798. now is the center for artists and galleries. young, educated people here feel increasingly left out of the system altogether. >> as a young womna, she -- woman, she worked in a missile factory. now she is a writer. >> this is at a crucial state. general reforms have to be introduced. there will be reforms but probably not as much as people hope for. i will say that there will be more protests. >> from this austere little flat in northwest beijing comes the quietly critical thoughts of a famous 23-year-old. facebook and twitter are banned here. on the chinese equivalent, she has nearly 6 million followers. more than victoria beckham. people are chatting on-line about politics and society. and strong censorship. chrysler posted something, staff
than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united healthcare. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the downfall of david petraeus showed no sign of fading into the background today. instead, there was every indication that his admission of adultery will echo far beyond the end of his career at the c.i.a. >> a personal scandal forces c.i.a. director david petraeus to... >> i want to start out with this out of the blue thunder bolt that hit washington friday. >> brown: all weekend in washington the details kept coming along with more questions. after david petraeus' sudden resignation on friday because he had had an extra marital affair quickly revealed to involve h
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)